Nafta Free Trade Agreement

NAFTA came into force on January 1, 1994. The agreement includes an environmental cooperation agreement and a cooperation agreement with workers. Before sending it to the U.S. Senate, Clinton added two subsidiary agreements, the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC) and the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC) to protect workers and the environment, as well as to allay the concerns of many members of the House of Representatives. The United States has required its partners to comply with similar environmental practices and regulations. [Citation required] After much attention and discussion, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act on November 17, 1993. Supporters of the deal included 132 Republicans and 102 Democrats. The legislation passed the Senate on November 20, 1993, 61-38. [21] The Supporters of the Senate were 34 Republicans and 27 Democrats. Republican Congressman David Dreier of California, a staunch supporter of NAFTA since the Reagan administration, has played a leading role in mobilizing support for the agreement among Republicans in Congress and across the country. [22] [23] The overall effect of the agricultural agreement between Mexico and the United States is controversial. Mexico has not invested in the infrastructure needed for competition, such as efficient railways and highways.

This has led to more difficult living conditions for the country`s poor. Mexico`s agricultural exports increased by 9.4% per year between 1994 and 2001, while imports increased by only 6.9% per year over the same period. [69] The impetus for a North American free trade area began with U.S. President Ronald Reagan, who made the idea part of his campaign by announcing his candidacy for president in November 1979. [15] Canada and the United States signed the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement in 1988, and shortly thereafter, Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari decided to address U.S. President George H.W. Bush to propose a similar agreement to make foreign investment after the Latin American debt crisis. [15] When the two leaders began negotiations, the Canadian government of Prime Minister Brian Mulroney feared that the benefits that Canada had gained through the Canada-U.S. free trade agreement would be undermined by a bilateral agreement between the United States and Mexico, and asked to be associated with the U.S.-Mexico talks. [16] Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders, who opposed the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement, called it “the continuation of other catastrophic trade agreements such as NAFTA, CAFTA and normal, sustainable trade relations with China.” He believes that free trade agreements have led to the loss of American jobs and lower U.S. wages.

Sanders said America needs to rebuild its production base with U.S. factories for well-paying jobs for the U.S. workforce, instead of relocating to China and elsewhere. [126] [127] [128] Agriculture, in particular, has seen a boost. Canada is the largest importer of U.S. agricultural products, and Canadian agricultural trade with the United States has more than tripled since 1994, as has Canada`s overall agricultural exports to NAFTA partners. The kick-off of a North American free trade area began with U.S. President Ronald Reagan, who made the idea part of his 1980 presidential campaign.

Following the signing of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement in 1988, U.S. governments became